Bienvenidos a Lima

I cannot believe I am nearly 20 days into my 80 day trip. What a trek it has been already. I have so much I want to share with you guys about Costa Rica in the future, and I am keeping a journal so I can keep all the memories alive for blogging. It’s not easy to write on the go I find, especially as I only have my trusted mobile phone to update you all with. It’s strange how a paragraph does not seem like a paragraph on a phone. Anyway, I digress, I am finally in Peru!

After a long day of travel between San Jose and Lima, I got here and pretty much passed out. Yesterday I went off on a Peruvian venture to discover the downtown of the city, where most historical buildings are located. With a warm welcome to Lima, I was even luckier because the city had celebrated just the night before its 482nd anniversary! So as I walked the Plaza de Armas, a government official stepped out of the Palacio Municipal de Lima (City Hall) to deliver a speech which touched the many that were present. I have no idea if it was a man of importance but the fact of the matter was that the city was bustling with a feel of celebration, peace and joy. It was great! What an amazing welcome to the country for me. 

I have discovered that I am actually enamored with colonial architecture. How sweet are the colours, so calming and inviting. And the space inside these buildings is beyond ridiculous! I’d love a little house like this in England, it would be a success, standing out from the built in blocs houses that are all a carbon copy of each other. Plus wooden floors and copious amounts of space for everything, even if I don’t necessarily want lots of stuff I like there to be empty space.

This is only a brief post as I saw so much yesterday, but let me just tell you that I purchased a bottle of Pisco for my man and I to get merry together and also I saw lamas! I mean only in Lima can you be walking downtown and find yourself in the same street as two lamas. How cool! Also I was wandering around and started to feel peckish so was able to buy two huge slices of pineapple for 50 pence, I mean how incredible, I love fruit. Tropical, sweet and juicy fruit. Speaking of food, I want you wall to appreciate my dinner last night that I couldn’t even finish, which cost me less than £4 with the drink included. God I love Peru already. 

I am sure I will have so much more to say and it is beginning to dawn on me that travel really does encourage self discovery. Well tonight I will also discover who I will be sharing this 35 day venture with! How exciting.

To finalise,  I have one question, how do you fellow backpackers go about souvenir shopping and lugging it around? Happy travel, writing and reading.

The lost treasure of keys – Tales of Travel gone wrong

As you know, I am currently traipsing around Costa Rica enjoying the pura vida and the sea turtles. Volunteering here has been an amazing experience, we really get to know the locals, brush up on our Spanish and embrace the culture of the area. Here the concerns are very ltitle as people just want to eat, beach and save turtles.

So a few days ago we were doing hatchery work, which you can read about here, and as I am knee deep into a hole of wet sand a lot of sand flies a lady approaches me. The tide was slowly but surely coming up and the sun setting perfectly in the background, decorating the skies with pink and orange hues, when this lady reveals that the buried her car keys in the sand and can no longer find them… I was baffled to say the least. Many questions sprung to my mind straight away. First of all who buries their car keys in the sand  for safe keeping? This beach only has around 10 punters a day and they only come out when they see the turtles being released. Secondly, if you’re going to bury something in the sand make sure you mark it so that you know where you put it.

So it turns out that as the tide started coming in the woman moved her chair first, which was the marker for the location of keys INSTEAD of the keys. Narurally, with sea water coming in an out at a rapid speed and dragging sand with it, she lost its location. She approached me and asked for some shovels we were using so we decided to be good samaritans and go help. We spent nearly 40 minutes digging hopelessly as the ocean dragged our feet, sand and potentially these disappeared keys to its depths. We did everything humanly possible to find them within the limited time and trying to trace the angle and original position of the chair through a selfie the lady had taken earlier on. The situation was awful but laughable. I honestly did not know whether to cry or laugh as the ocean continued to eat at the beach and the light was disappearing.

By the time we left the beach the whole family was still there, hopelessly searching but also celebrating in glee the hilarity and ridiculousness of the whole scenario. They now plunged into the water aimlessly continuimg their search if anything just to try their best to recover their treasure and head home.

I do not know if they ever found them. I don’t know how they even left the beach that evening, but they suffered, searched, thrived and laughed through it together, never stressing and taking it on their stride. I genuinely think they took it home as a great story to tell the kids.

Saving the Turtles – volunteering

For those of you who know me incredibly well or have read my rant about my love for animals (click here), then you would know that the very first thing I would like to invest on doing while abroad is volunteering. So here I am in Costa Rica’s gorgeous Pacific Coast saving the turtles.

Playa Junquilall is a very secluded place with a small population of 300 people. The whole community has a deep respect and love for the sea turtles that come here every year to lay their eggs and start new turtle families. So in general there is a huge focus on the area to help rescue these creatures.  I will share more information on all of this and how my volunteering program came to be on a later post, today I want to talk to you specifically about hatchery work.

So most turtle eggs are rescued by us and nested in a hatchery to minimise the risk of them being eaten by any birds, crabs or getting bugs all over them.

Yesterday was my first time working at the hatchery. We replaced a nest for a new and bigger one for leatherback turtles, cleaned out all the sand, replaced it with new wet sand which is preferable so that the nests do not collapse. Afterwards we had to replace some poles to secure the fence and freshen up all the hatchery by putting a new fresh layer of wet sand. Controlling the temperature is key for the turtles to develop well. Finally we put another roof up to provide extra shade.

The hatchery duty and its maintenance lasts 3 hours in the afternoon and it can be very tiring as the sun scorching hot. However, contrary to many friends of mine that have done humanitarian volunteering felt at times that they were not contributing, I know for a fact that all my hard work here is helping in the maintenance of thsee animals, the local environment and their protection.

This morning, for example, we got to release a baby Olive Ridley turtle (Lora) and it was great to see the beautiful little thing head off after our hard work to protect and help it. I will post videos of her release some other day and also about our patrol work and what it is like. For now I leave you with this and a few photos of some of the most rewarding work I have ever done.