The Petroleum Museum

Very few museums in the world leave me completely baffled. Having been to my fair share of art museums/galleries, several similar versions of natural history and science museums and seen a lot of state buildings become history spouting machines, the Petroleum Museum left me truly amazed. Petroleum, as we all know, is the leading industry in the world! It is the highest consumed source of energy and we use it day in day out, so learning a bit more about it in an interactive way is absolutely an experience.

The museum is built on an out of use oil rig and then further expanded. You will start by watching a film about the history of petroleum and how it seems to have become such an essential part of our lives and existence even. Following that, there are several machines that demonstrate the progression of equipment that was used to extract petroleum from the core of our planet, and you can even play on a simulated oil rig! However, most importantly, the museum gives us a true understanding of why we need to find alternative sources of fuel and energy. We are bombarded by this day in day out, and yet we continue to consume. I know it is very far away, but the museum really made me understand it differently and take more notice. However, I am yet left with this feeling of what can I do? I have a car to run and all these other things that demand the consumption of petroleum. I truly hope we find a solution.

The interactive nature of the museum paired with the relevance of the content make it truly incredible and it is an absolute must to visit whilst in Stavanger.

 

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Nazca Lines – what the Gods see

Before I get into the experience of seeing the Nazca Lines in person, let me explain what they are. The lines are considered geoglyphs, which are huge motifs usually carved onto the ground, they are a somewhat similar concept to hieroglyphs but far larger in scale as if made to be seen by the Gods.

The Nazca lines are the largest collection of geoglyphs found in such close proximity to one another, currently counting at over 70 figures across Pampas de Jumama in Peru. It is assumed that they were made by the Nazca people circa 400 to 650 AD. The Nazca were known as the ancient people who were able to make the desert fruitful and were also skilled artists, which explains, somewhat, the intricacy of the geoglyphs and the people’s ability to design at such a large scale. On the other hand, others think that due to the dimensions of the drawings, it is impossible that the people could have potentially drawn at such a scale without an aircraft for perspective or alien aid. The biggest, discovered, is as large as 370 metres (1200 ft).

The only way to explore some of these incredible designs is by flying in a small aircraft and soaring through the skies looking at them. They are truly incredible and the images are fantastic to see. We flew with AeroNasca, but there are plenty of other airlines. It is quite costly, we paid 180$ (USD) each for a five seat air craft. I also have to strongly advise you, if you are anything like me and really get motion sickness, all the tablets in the world might not help you (they did not help me!) so make sure you are hydrated, avoid looking through your camera (this is why the photos are probably not very good!) and don’t eat anything that you are unsure of for breakfast. Trust me.

Given the terrain which the glyphs are found on, I was amazed at how clear they were once they were pointed out. In a way I almost feel like all the random lines are there on purpose to distract viewers from finding them!

I cannot suggest it any more! It was truly magical and I felt like I was peering through the eyes of a God on a canvas so beautiful and untainted, that I will never truly know if I believe it to be man-made.

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The Spider
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The Humingbird
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The Austronaut

 

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The Whale

 

Bienvenidos a Lima

I cannot believe I am nearly 20 days into my 80 day trip. What a trek it has been already. I have so much I want to share with you guys about Costa Rica in the future, and I am keeping a journal so I can keep all the memories alive for blogging. It’s not easy to write on the go I find, especially as I only have my trusted mobile phone to update you all with. It’s strange how a paragraph does not seem like a paragraph on a phone. Anyway, I digress, I am finally in Peru!

After a long day of travel between San Jose and Lima, I got here and pretty much passed out. Yesterday I went off on a Peruvian venture to discover the downtown of the city, where most historical buildings are located. With a warm welcome to Lima, I was even luckier because the city had celebrated just the night before its 482nd anniversary! So as I walked the Plaza de Armas, a government official stepped out of the Palacio Municipal de Lima (City Hall) to deliver a speech which touched the many that were present. I have no idea if it was a man of importance but the fact of the matter was that the city was bustling with a feel of celebration, peace and joy. It was great! What an amazing welcome to the country for me. 

I have discovered that I am actually enamored with colonial architecture. How sweet are the colours, so calming and inviting. And the space inside these buildings is beyond ridiculous! I’d love a little house like this in England, it would be a success, standing out from the built in blocs houses that are all a carbon copy of each other. Plus wooden floors and copious amounts of space for everything, even if I don’t necessarily want lots of stuff I like there to be empty space.

This is only a brief post as I saw so much yesterday, but let me just tell you that I purchased a bottle of Pisco for my man and I to get merry together and also I saw lamas! I mean only in Lima can you be walking downtown and find yourself in the same street as two lamas. How cool! Also I was wandering around and started to feel peckish so was able to buy two huge slices of pineapple for 50 pence, I mean how incredible, I love fruit. Tropical, sweet and juicy fruit. Speaking of food, I want you wall to appreciate my dinner last night that I couldn’t even finish, which cost me less than £4 with the drink included. God I love Peru already. 

I am sure I will have so much more to say and it is beginning to dawn on me that travel really does encourage self discovery. Well tonight I will also discover who I will be sharing this 35 day venture with! How exciting.

To finalise,  I have one question, how do you fellow backpackers go about souvenir shopping and lugging it around? Happy travel, writing and reading.

Hiking the Ulriken

So the national past time in Norway has to be hiking. 

My partner and I donned our really unfashionable but sturdy hiking boots to trek the Ulriken, a stunning mountain that you can see from the centre of Bergen. The peak is about 645 metres up and the hike takes on various curves that make you fall in love with the shapely mountain.

The trek we took crosses over with some cycle paths, so be sure not to get slammed on by a mountain bike, and it took us around 2 to 2 and a half hours to hike up, with lots of stops for photos, snacks and water breaks. I would also say that the path at times is not very clear, you are pretty much winging your way up the mountain through difficult and ever changing terrain, but it is stunning and totally worth it. It is also the best work out in the world.

Overall, the trek is meant to take around an hour to an hour and a half for those with more experience, know the path and haven’t carried a crappy back pack. I can tell you now, the correct back pack with lumber support is key! Lesson learned. None of this fashionable pretty looking business for any type of trek in the future. Make sure you always take a rain coat of sorts because Norway is temperamental and renowned for having the most consecutive days of rain… 295 in 2015.

This was a fantastic way to break my hiking boots in preparation for the treks in South America. I think it would have been great if the trek was better signed but it was still do-able as you can see the end line throughout the trek. You walk through some really great locations, it is so refreshing and helps clear your mind. You won’t get to see many people on your hike either, but the few you do will be like mountain goats. This is no joke. The national past time must be hiking, they fly up and down the mountain as if they have no fear of falling off the face of the rock. We saw children hiking too! It was amazing, such a healthy way of living and it made me want to do it so much more. Inspiring really.

Once you get to the top enjoy the mesmerising views and make sure you give yourself a well earned sit down, a hot drink and some food. It was just breath taking. After all the sweat, slipping on a few rocks and the heavens opening up and drenching us head to toe, we reached the summit and it was so worth the work. It was the most beautiful experience, and I wish we had had more time to trek other mountains but sadly we did not. I cannot wait for our next Norwegian adventure and to hike some well known paths in Stavanger next time. For now, enjoy some photos of our trek up the Ulriken.

Happy reading, writing and travelling!

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View from the top

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Walking in Krakow

For all you people who believe there is more to life than an underground/subway, you are right! There are so many places that can be discovered by foot and truly appreciated after you have lost yourself in a really quirky and romantic cobbled street to get there. The sights you miss when you simply rush from tourist spot to tourist spot in a subway is deeply saddening, so my mother and I decided to save the pennies and work our leg muscles, and walking Krakow was a treat!

With lots of people and companies harassing you to take their guided tourist train tour, to join their groups and do their thing, it is pleasant to step back from all of that and just do what you think is right. Discover the places you want, get to know a city in your terms and to find the hidden treasures only you will come across in your own path.

Walking the city centre

Krakow’s Main Square hosts a variety of interest. If you walk around the whole square, hidden behind the cafes and all those esplanades you will find some plaques identifying the houses, who they belonged to and their historical importance.

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At the very centre of the Main Square you will be able to see the Cloth Hall. It used to be a building where people would come to trade all sorts of goods, but now it is open every day and showcases the most stunning handicrafts from Poland for you to buy. Great for souvenir shopping.

You will also find in the city centre St Mary’s Basilica. This iconic building is the cover of most postcards of Krakow and though it may seem like a simple brick construction from the exterior, the inside tells a very different story.

You will get a chance to spot some horse and carriages which you can take a lovely tour of the city in. I personally did not take one, but found them all very charming and the horses very sweet. It is a miracle that they keep the city so clean and not smelling of manure with so many horses around.

Make sure you have one of your meals in the Main Square, with so many restaurants available you can enjoy some real treats.

Further afield

Still a short walk away, you can follow a road directly to the Wawel. Here you can enjoy the castle, the cathedral, the Dragon’s cave and so much more. No more than a 10 minute walk from the Main Square it is definitely worth a visit and has so much to offer.

On your way to Wawel, make sure you take a quick peak at the St Peter and Paul Church. Such a beautiful building and it is worth spending a few minutes being mesmerised by its interior. Simple, beautiful and yet haunting. I definitely recommend it.

The Ring Gardens! Surrounding the entire centre of town, a ring garden which is worth walking around to see the city from a different perspective, enjoy the greenery and fresh air as well.

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Krakow is a very easy city to see by foot, so unless you are venturing out to the concentration camps and the salt mine, save your money, save the environment and put your best walking trainers on! I think everyone should feel encouraged to enjoy their cities by walking and discovering some really lovely hidden gems.