Google Art #DiscoveryFriday

My beautiful man text me the other day in a frenzy saying ‘Google Deep Dream Generator’. I did so, uploaded an image and what I got was a whole new way of seeing what my lens has captured. They art is all about perception, that when people look at the clouds they see different things, psychologists do the same with ink blotch tests, and some people can’t make out constellations where was others see them straight away.

That is what Deep Dream Generator offers you, a chance to see what you haven’t seen before in images that you have captured yourself! So here are some samples of what I made on the website.

Please click the photos to see them bigger and compare!

I already love all my travelling photos as they let me revisit the places I have seen, but in this sample of my time in Mozambique – read all about it here – I now see these dream like fantasies that I can’t un-see and I love how artistic they are. I love how a simple images have become such a dreamlike reality.

I urge you to try it! Click here to visit the Deep Dream Generator.

Happy reading, writing and dream generating!

 

 

Chess: in concert #TheatreReview

Thursday 14th of April 2016, I had the pleasure of watching Chess, in concert, a production by my favourite – I am very biased! – Amateur Dramatics Group, The Hitchin Thespians

Chess is a musical with music by Benny Andersson and Bjorn Ulvaeus from Abba and lyrics by Tim Rice, which is set in the cold war era and comments on the political status of USA and Russia during that time through the parallel of a chess tournament. Historically the musical was a huge success in the West End where it played for 3 years, opening on 1986. No major attempts at reviving the musical have been made, but it continues to be one of the most relevant musical placing 7th in BBC Radio 2’s “Number One Essential Musicals” list, demonstrating its strength as a piece.

The Thespians, an operatic amateur dramatics society that has been around for over 100 years and decided to tackle this incredible piece but in a concert version. I loved every second but have to be analytical of a few things that theatrically did not work.

The space at Woodside hall where the thespians perform is rectangular, usually the stage is located at one of the narrower ends of the stage but this time they decided to go for a long stage and long seating. This allowed them to add the members of choir either side of the central stage. However, this caused a huge unbalance in the sound where audiences on either side could only really hear the choir directly infront of them. Audience members sat in the central area were welcomed with a fantastic wall of sound however.

Performances were excellent from the main cast, as usual the pool of talent in the society oozes and they never cease to impress. The band again was incredible, giving the sound of a full orchestra and musical band with just two pianos and a drum set. Overall for an amateur production, with limited space and flexibility they tackled their issues head on and tried to make it work as best as possible. Still a completely enjoyable performance and I think that for any growing theatre producer, actor, practitioner, director etc it is important to see as many productions that can show you the type of challenges that you can encounter. However, it is s much fun to come up with alternatives to make it work. So if you don’t come and watch the Hitchin Thespians, go watch your own local theatre group, to watch some incredible untapped talent and to learn more about the basics of the beautiful thing that is theatre and live performance.

The Hungarian Parliament #Budapest

The Hungarian Parliament is one of the most stunning and architecturally breath taking buildings. The sheer details both in the exterior and interior of the building make it a truly magnificent landmark and it is time I share some of its history with you.

In 1873 Budapest was born, as a unity of 3 cities that reside in the banks of the Danube. To celebrate this momentous occasion the Hungarian parliament decided to launch a competition to build a new building that represented the sovereignty of the nation. Imre Steindl emerged victorious from this competition and the new Parliament began construction soon after.

The building which is of renaissance revival style, is a symmetrical façade with a central dome that features in its perfect centre, the Holy Crown of Hungary. The Holy Crown of Hungary is the only crown that has EVER been used by the entire monarchy of Hungary. For this reason it is heavily protected and you are not allowed to stand closer than 2 metres from the glass case around it or take photos. there are two guards that stand either side of the glass case and move their swords every 5 minutes. Every 15 minutes they do a full circle around the crown and say a few words and move their swords once more. Guards are changed every hour. We were told by the guide that it a pleasure and honour for them to protect the crown… I wish she had seen the look on the guards’ faces. However, it is beautiful and the room it is in, the central point of the entire building, holds statues of each monarch of the Hungarian monarchy before.

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Other fun facts about this phenomenal grand building, are that almost every column and wall is decorated with real gold leaves from around 3 metres and above. They have used around 40 kg of gold to cover the columns and leaves in the thinnest and most delicate sheets of gold.

The Parliament was built on Pest side of the river to show the strength and unity of the newly formed and established republican structure of the government in contrast to the monarchy which is demonstrated by the castle on Buda side.

I would definitely encourage everyone to visit. It is one of the priciest monuments to visit, but the experience is well worth the 4000FT. It is so fascinating to see the room in which the debates are held and the grandeur of it all, and yet it is somewhat simple at the same time and therefore a familiar sight. I was often conflicted between feeling amazed and feeling as if this was a place I knew really well. Steindl’s simple structure for the building also makes it easy to navigate and keep your bearings, whilst admiring the intricate decoration and extravagance. A must see.

Happy reading, writing and travelling!